Monday, July 22, 2013


According to a study published in the journal SLEEP, the more hours a person works, the less sleep he or she gets. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 30 percent of employed Americans get less than the recommended seven to nine hours of sleep a day.
 Though you may not feel especially tired, lack of sleep could be affecting your performance at work. One study found that sleeping less than six hours a night was one of the best predictors of job burnout. Another study calculated that our collective lack of sleep costs U.S. businesses and medical centers $63.2 billion a year in lost productivity. In other words, you’re actually doing yourself — and your career — a disservice by letting work take away from your sleep time. Establish a hard stop time a few hours before bed and stick to it.

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